Belmont Glass Company Pattern 100 – Daisy & Button

Belmont Glass Works was one of the first glass companies established in Bellaire, OH. It operated between 1866-1890. Belmont had its own foundry and made its own molds as early as 1870. In addition, Belmont chipped molds for other companies including McKee, Crystal Glass Company, Central Glass Company, Elson Glass Company, Gillinder Brothers, and Fostoria Glass. (Revi, American Pressed Glass and Figure Bottles, p. 69-71.) Harvey Leighton was the manager for Belmont in 1884.

Belmont began its operations as a chimney factory but soon began producing pressed ware for the kitchen and bars as well as lamps. In 1885 Belmont introduced colored glass. (Welker, p. 32). In July, 1890 the stockholders decided to liquidate the business since it losing money. The Belmont molds were sold to Crystal Glass Co., Bridgeport OH and Central Glass Co. By 1893 the factory was torn down to build a new factory Novelty Stamping Co.

Belmont made a number of patterns, but probably its most famous is Pattern 100, Daisy & Button. This is probably the most ornate Daisy & Button pattern made by any of the pattern makers. Belmont made the pattern in colors including Canary yellow, known as vaseline glass.

Belmont Pattern 100 Daisy & Button Covered Compote

Belmont Pattern 100 Daisy & Button
Covered Compote

 

Belmont Pattern 100 Shows different sections

Belmont Pattern 100
Shows different sections

Top Section, base to stem and stem skirt added separately

Top Section, base to stem and stem skirt added separately

The covered compote is particularly interesting. Not only is it extremely ornate, you can see how the piece was made in several pieces at different times. At the time this piece was made pressed glass manufacturing had not progressed to the point that such an ornate compote (bottom) could be made at one time. If you look closely at the photos, you can see where the rim was added to the top of the compote. Farther down on the bowl you can see where the bottom of the bowl piece was added to the pedestal. This was done by fusing (heating) wafers of glass to add the pedestal. Then, when looking at the scalloped base, you can see a line where the scalloped base was added to the pedestal. Making the piece was quite an ordeal. Just think about the work that went into chipping the design in the mold. The mold was most likely iron. Molds could take more than a month to make and could cost in the thousands of dollars.

The lid to this piece is interesting as well. The pattern is on the inside of the lid rather than on the outside as the compote design is. The design is only on the top part of the lid which fits inside the bowl. The bottom of the lid is clear. The finial is knob is round and has a bar through it.

Lid design is on inside

Lid design is on inside

Finial was added separately

Finial was added separately

 

The glass is not perfectly clear because of its age. Glass often changed from clear to having a slight amethyst tint because of the chemicals used in the glass mixture. Manganese was used in the glass mixture to add clarity to the finished product. Unfortunately, as the glass aged the manganese also caused the glass to change color especially when exposed to direct sunlight. The tint in this piece is very slight.

 

A beautiful piece of antique glassware

A beautiful piece of antique glassware

See this piece at PAST WARES.

SOURCES: Revi, American Pressed Glass and Figure Bottles, p. 69-71; Welker, Pressed Glass in America Encyclopedia of the First Hundred Years 1825-1925, p. 32; Shotwell, Glass A TO Z, P. 37.

 

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About tizzyloucat

I'm a retired paralegal and live in sunny SW Florida. I have an online store where I sell animal themed collectibles and vintage and antique glassware.
This entry was posted in Daisy Button Pattern, Glassware, History and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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